Category Archives: Elizabethan Architecture

The Weirdness of the Topography of ‘The Favourite’

The Favourite is set in about 1705-1711 in London, at presumably, notionally, Kensington Palace, Queen Anne’s principal residence, where, according to Wikipedia, the final falling out between Queen Anne and the Duchess of Marlborough took place. The setting could, however, … Continue reading

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Portmeirion 1. Introduction

People don’t always get Portmeirion (Fig. 1). For example, it has been argued that it is a proto-Post-Modernist work, created by an architect trying to subvert the modernist norm long before Venturi and Scott-Brown came on the scene. But this … Continue reading

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On Water-spouts. Chastleton House

At Chastleton House there is a dovecote in the field over the road that is all that remains of another house there (Fig. 1). It dates from 1762. It is square in plan, with four arches on the ground floor … Continue reading

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On Elizabethan Windows

Elizabethan windows can for practical purposes be defined as windows, often in the form of a bay, divided into tall vertical strips by mullions, and normally crossed by a single horizontal mullion high up, so that the upper panels are … Continue reading

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The Roof of Burghley House

The first thing you see as you approach Burghley House (Stamford, Lincolnshire) is the amazing roof, with its curious hybrid of Tudor and classical and the gleaming golden flags. In Fig. 1 there are interesting pairings: between the two-column chimney … Continue reading

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